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Photoshop:

Have several pictures to covert? Use Photoshops batch convert feature. Simply record an action by opening a photo and manipulating all the basic steps that need to be done on all photos and then save. Stop recording your action and then go to File >Automate >Batch and follow the steps. What took you an hour to open, modify and save will now be done in just a few minutes!

Quark XPress:

If you've had the problem of forgetting to back-up your document that you've spent hours on...go to the applications setting and set for Auto Backup every 10-15 minutes. It'll save you that sinking feeling when a bomb shows up on your screen.

Illustrator:

For color trapping, swell any light color into a darker one with the stroke tool. Then set to overprint in the paint palette. It won't show up right on screen or on your digital output, but the colors will seperate properly.

PageMaker:

An exellent program for small businesses who need to be up and running without a lot of training. Also has excellent utilities for creating books that are ready to send to your printer.

InDesign:

High end capabilities with high end control. Capable of opening native Illustrator and Photoshop files to enhance page layout.

Scanning:

To have the best image quality in printing or copying, you must meet certain minimum requirements.

There are two types of programs used to produce artwork—vector and bitmap. Most scanning software generally sends an image into a bitmap program because scanners see images in a pattern of very small dots called pixels. There are such programs as Adobe Streamline that convert bitmap images into vector images.

Before giving tips on scanning, we want to point out the differences between the two types of programs.

Vector Programs

Vector programs use mathematical formulas to create an entire image. Illustrator, Freehand and Corel Draw are the most common of such programs; they enable you to create shapes composed of points and curves. When saving files, you should consider the following items:

• The finished size of artwork is important because if you create a fairly intricate piece of artwork but your final output is less than an inch across, your design will be lost. On the other hand, you can generally enlarge an image to any desired size, but small errors will be magnified.
• Colors used is very important, especially if you have colors that touch or overlap. While digital output devices work quite well in this area, offset printing is not as accurate. To have to include trapping to address this problem. In other words, you must make the colors overlap just a bit, so any inaccuracy in the printing process will go unnoticed.
• The final output device is important as well because current ink jet printers tend to cause jagged edges on otherwise smooth designs.

Bitmap Programs

Bitmap programs use square dots to build an entire image. Photoshop, Painter and Canvas are the most common of such programs; they enable you to create a canvas and use brushes and other tools to draw an image. When working with these images, you should consider the following items:
• The final output, depending on the finished size of artwork, can show flaws or lose detail.
• Resolution is important when considering where the printed image will appear. Copy some image from the Internet sometime, and then print it on your laser printer. Looks pretty good, but not as good as on screen, right? That's because the screen resolution is much lower than what is necessary for print.

• The final output device can either help an image or hurt it. Again, too low a resolution can cause an image to look jagged and dull.

Scanning TipsFor any printed photos (in color or black and white) at 100% of their sizes, you do not need to scan at higher than 300 dpi unless you plan on enlarging the image. Use 170 dpi for newsprint and 72 dpi for web pages.

For line art or text, do not scan at lower than 800 dpi. 1000 dpi to 1200 dpi is better, provided you have the disk space.

It is smart to have your final image the exact size it will be when printed. This saves disk space (which may be crucial if you must e-mail the image or fit it on a disk) and increases output time. Ever sit and wait on a page to print out on your laser printer? It may be because the page graphic is fairly large.

Scanning:

To have the best image quality in printing or copying, you must meet certain minimum requirements.

There are two types of programs used to produce artwork—vector and bitmap. Most scanning software generally sends an image into a bitmap program because scanners see images in a pattern of very small dots called pixels. There are such programs as Adobe Streamline that convert bitmap images into vector images.

Before giving tips on scanning, we want to point out the differences between the two types of programs.

Vector Programs

Vector programs use mathematical formulas to create an entire image. Illustrator, Freehand and Corel Draw are the most common of such programs; they enable you to create shapes composed of points and curves. When saving files, you should consider the following items:

• The finished size of artwork is important because if you create a fairly intricate piece of artwork but your final output is less than an inch across, your design will be lost. On the other hand, you can generally enlarge an image to any desired size, but small errors will be magnified.
• Colors used is very important, especially if you have colors that touch or overlap. While digital output devices work quite well in this area, offset printing is not as accurate. To have to include trapping to address this problem. In other words, you must make the colors overlap just a bit, so any inaccuracy in the printing process will go unnoticed.
• The final output device is important as well because current ink jet printers tend to cause jagged edges on otherwise smooth designs.

Bitmap Programs

Bitmap programs use square dots to build an entire image. Photoshop, Painter and Canvas are the most common of such programs; they enable you to create a canvas and use brushes and other tools to draw an image. When working with these images, you should consider the following items:
• The final output, depending on the finished size of artwork, can show flaws or lose detail.
• Resolution is important when considering where the printed image will appear. Copy some image from the Internet sometime, and then print it on your laser printer. Looks pretty good, but not as good as on screen, right? That's because the screen resolution is much lower than what is necessary for print.

• The final output device can either help an image or hurt it. Again, too low a resolution can cause an image to look jagged and dull.

Scanning Tips

For any printed photos (in color or black and white) at 100% of their sizes, you do not need to scan at higher than 300 dpi unless you plan on enlarging the image. Use 170 dpi for newsprint and 72 dpi for web pages.

For line art or text, do not scan at lower than 800 dpi. 1000 dpi to 1200 dpi is better, provided you have the disk space.

It is smart to have your final image the exact size it will be when printed. This saves disk space (which may be crucial if you must e-mail the image or fit it on a disk) and increases output time. Ever sit and wait on a page to print out on your laser printer? It may be because the page graphic is fairly large.



Request a free price quote here for your next printing or copying project. You may also contact us by e-mail or by phone at 479.444.7711.